The Port Mann Bridge has a new way of keeping clear of snow

By Staff, November 1, 2017

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The winter months can be harsh on your commute, especially if you have to travel over the Port Mann Bridge, outside Vancouver. Luckily, TI Corp has designed a method for clearing snow from the bridges 288 suspension cables called the snow clearing collar system.

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12 Comments

  1. Sam Blackman says:

    wow amazing I love learning about this kind of stuff

  2. Jamessuperfun says:

    Pretty simple since it’s just a chain being slid down but cool nonetheless

  3. Kent VanderVelden says:

    Clever, wish it was more autonomous and self retracting. Some young engineer today is going to figure that out.

    • GG says:

      I’m sure it already exists. When they built this bridge they never thought about snow and ice accumulation. At least judging from what happened in its initial first winter. Basically ice and snow kept falling down on cars and cracking windows!!!! It was all over the news here. The firm that built it was American and I’m guessing they didn’t think about snow and ice. This is pretty much an after market solution.

    • Kent VanderVelden says:

      +GG Thank you, very interesting. The “after market” description works well. I read the Wikipedia article, this is a big bridge!

    • Smooth Chaos says:

      Kent VanderVelden magnetic force?

  4. FUBOL7 says:

    Leave it to some entrepreneur to create a coating that prevents snow buildup.

  5. Bob McCoy says:

    I’ve always wanted to slide down one of those poles…

  6. LUQMAN WADOOD says:

    Amazing but why not use fire

  7. 加藤みずっち says:

    Tech Insider, my man !!

  8. Jose Aguilar says:

    i want that job

  9. Sir Iodine says:

    Haha or you could just heat up the cables